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Habitat Restoration

February 8 @ 8:30 am - 2:30 pm

|Recurring Event (See all)
The plan is to have 2 days of habitat work. One on February 7th (Thursday) and February 8th (Friday).
Free

LOCATION:
We will meet at Secundino Rd (Directions are below). After everyone has arrived we will car pool.The reason for carpooling is the road gets a little rougher and sedan type vehicles with low clearance will not be able to make it. IF YOU CAN CARPOOL LET ME (Joe Bozzo) KNOW AND GIVE ME AMOUNT OF SEATS YOU HAVE AVAILABLE. I will try to get a count of people in smaller vehicles and plan accordingly. We will be driving down Secundino Rd till we get to the first intersection then we will take a right turn and go down that road about a mile.

GENERAL INFORMATION:
LUNCH: Bring your own, we eat at 12; however, if you are hungry before feel free to stop and eat.

DIRECTIONS FROM TUCSON:
If you are coming from Tucson and going down W Ajo hwy (highway 86) you will turn left at Three Points onto highway 286 then proceed south until you reach mile 15 and a half and the road will be on your left or to the east.

DIRECTIONS FROM GREEN VALLEY:
If you are coming from Green Valley/ Arivaca area, you will go south on route I-19 then get off at exit 48 to get on to Arivaca Rd. Go through Arivaca and continue on Arivaca Sasabe Rd until you reach highway 286 then make a right turn and go to mile 15 an a half and Secundino Rd will be on your right.

QUAIL HABITAT PROJECT:

WHY WE ARE DOING HABITAT WORK:
The habitat work is to stop mesquite encroachment and enhance cover for upland game birds specifically the masked bobwhite (an endangered quail species native to southern AZ). Removing mesquite will also make space and resources more available for forbs and grasses, creating more browse for ungulate populations and other animals.

WHAT WE WILL BE DOING:
The first management tactic is half cutting which is exactly what it sounds like; you cut half way through mesquite branches with a hand saw and bend them to the ground creating more shrub like woody vegetation. This tactic is utilized in areas with low percentages of good woody cover.

The other management tactic is removing mesquite trees entirely through manual means such as loppers on smaller trees and mechanical means such as chainsaws on larger trees. Anyone who is qualified by a FWS chainsaw class or is covered by a special use permit issued by the refuge manager can operate a chainsaw to cut mesquite flush to the ground. Once the tree is cut the stumps are then sprayed with herbicide (Garlon) to stop regrowth. People who want to spray will also have to go through a brief safety and operating lesson. This management tactic is utilized in areas with high percentages of good woody cover.

WHAT TO BRING:
Please bring your own PPE (personal protective equipment) if possible, including appropriate clothing: heavy duty gloves, long sleeves, pants, hat, sunglasses/protective glasses, boots. We have a limited amount of PPE for use. I will provide a large jug or two of water depending on amount of volunteers that day. You need to bring your own food and water maybe a cooler too.

KEEP IN MIND:
Safety is the number one priority. If you intend on coming to help know your own limits and do not push yourselves too hard. Stay hydrated during the day and please hydrate the day before and get a good nights sleep.

PAPERWORK:
The only paper work needed to be filled out is a volunteer agreement form and I will print out for all of you to fill out. It only takes about 10 minutes to fill those out.

Contact Joseph Bozzo with any questions jcbozzo253@gmail.com

Details

Date:
February 8
Time:
8:30 am - 2:30 pm
Cost:
Free
Event Categories:
,

Venue

Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge
37257 S Sasabe Rd
Sasabe, 85633 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
5204036048
Website:
https://www.fws.gov/refuge/buenos_aires/